The Mary McAleese Boyne Valley Bridge is a cable-stayed bridge in County Meath, and County LouthIreland.[1] It spans the Boyne River 3 kilometres (1.9 mi) west of Drogheda on the county boundary between County Meath and County Louth and is part of the M1 Northern Motorway. When it opened in June 2003, it was the longest cable-stayed bridge in Ireland until 19 October 2009, when the River Suir Bridge opened on the M25. The bridge was built from 2000 to 2003.

A landmark lighting project on the M1 motorway from Dublin to Belfast, at a total length of 300meters long and a height of 80meters. This monumental project required high-level attention to detail throughout the process. Continual coordination between all parties ensured that the lighting project delivered, whilst respecting all highway codes. Precise cool white custom engineered projectors with additional glare control and specially selected blue colour filters were used to wash the structure and create a beacon within the night landscape. The actual road lighting was also specially design and configured, with blue light sources to match the architectural lighting of the bridge structure.

Project Lighting Designer Neil Skinner whilst at LDP/Lightmatters

Founded in 1135 for canons of the Augustinian order, Brinkburn was restored in the 19th century and now survives in its entirety as Northumberland's finest example of early Gothic architecture. It is easy to understand why the Augustinian canons who arrived at Brinkburn in 1135AD chose this beautiful setting for their priory, lying as it does in a hollow, almost surrounded by a loop in the River Coquet. Parts of the monastic buildings are incorporated into the elegant adjacent manor house. The magic of Brinkburn Priory lives on in the visitor's memory long after its graceful Gothic architecture and glowing stained glass have been left behind.

This was a very sensitive lighting and electrical project to coordinate. After a number of site meetings and workshops, it was concluded that the vertical surfaces of the Priory could not be touched. A totally bespoke design and product were required to provide the various scenes illumination, whilst not disturbing the original stone work. The lighting design was to illuminate the interior for functional and architectural purpose, but also to provide event quality illumination for musicians for classical music concerts. Oversized, floor standing, adjustable spotlight products were especially design for the project. By using a floor standing product, no walls were touched. However, the Victorian floor was carefully disassembled and reassembled to allow for new power cables to run around the floor.  All the lighting can be unplugged and removed to bring the Priory back to its original stark beautiful state.

As a place of serenity and worship, creating a welcoming and calm environment is absolute key within the project. Without an appropriate lighting control dimming system, the lighting project would not work. By using a control system, to adjust the light levels and set various scenes for services and events, the various spaces throughout the Abbey are scene set to appropriate light levels. This means that depending on the event occurring or daylight ingress levels, the intensity of the artificial light is adjusted accordingly. By using the lighting control system, vast amounts of energy is saved, along with running and maintenance costs.

Project Lighting Designer Neil Skinner whilst at 1860 Lighting Consultants

CLIENT – English Heritage

SKR Lighting Design were tasked with providing dramatic yet sympathetic and practical lighting to illuminate ‘Castle Mound’ in Oxford, on which defences were built in 1071AD for William the Conqueror. Whilst the castle itself is no longer there, Castle Mound itself is a considerable feature of the landscape: 64ft high and 81ft in diameter, with a well chamber 20ft below the surface added to the top of the mound in the thirteenth century.

The mound needed to be lit on a practical level to illuminate its paths to the summit, but also to provide an attractive and intriguing presentation of the mound which would be visible from a distance. the impact of light pollution on the surrounding environment and energy efficiency also had to be considered, as well as due consideration given to the age and Grade-1-listed status of the monument.

We worked closely with architects, archaeologists, and the local heritage authority to decide on a design. We illuminated the meandering pathways using colour changing floor washers – practical but striking. The existing lighting to the trees on the mound was replaced with colour-changing and energy-efficient light sources.

The end result is a beautiful celebration of an ancient landmark, without negative impact on the surrounding cityscape.

https://www.oxfordpreservation.org.uk/

https://www.oxfordshire.gov.uk/

https://www.oxfordcastleandprison.co.uk/ 

https://www.studiodue.com/en/

https://yesevents.co.uk/  

The Rows at Chester are a unique series of two tired and mostly black and white half-timbered buildings joined with long galleries used as shopping arcades. They consist of covered walkways at the first floor behind which are entrances to shops while at street level is another set of shops and other premises. Rows were built in the four main streets leading out from Chester Cross.

Dating from the medieval era, the Rows may have been built on top of rubble remaining from the ruins of Roman buildings, but their origin is still subject to speculation. Today the premises on the street and Row levels are used for a variety of purposes; most are shops, but there are also offices, restaurants, cafés, and meeting rooms. Chester Rows are one of the city’s main tourist attractions.

Project Lighting Designer Neil Skinner whilst at LDP/Lightmatters

https://www.cheshirewestandchester.gov.uk/ 

The Parish Church of St. Peter & St. Paul in Deddington, Oxfordshire has been at the heart of the local community since the 13th century. Evolving architecturally since then and in the recent years SKR have played a role in the important events such as at Christmas time by setting up temporary lighting equipment to showcasing festive scenes with dynamic, colour changing projections for all to enjoy during musical events and recitals. In time for the festive season RGB festoon lighting is mounted at the crown of the Tower adding a touch of colour to the village during the darker months of the year.

Founded in AD678, Hexham Abbey is one of the earliest seats of Christianity in England​ and remains at the heart of the town to this day.

As with all heritage projects, the design process is delicate and must be handled sensitively. Neil Skinner was principle lighting designer on this project between 1999 – 2002. Pragmatic solutions were required to illuminate the Abbey, using both theatrical and architectural lighting techniques. Installation locations and cable routes were an issue that were overcome by designing a new spotlight specifically for the project, in partnership with lighting manufacture Light Projects. The spotlights were created for easy of maintenance, maximum flexibility and architectural discreet mounting. Leading decorative lighting supplier Chelsom provided the project with new and updated chandeliers which enhanced the elegance of the space.

As a place of serenity and worship, creating a welcoming and calm environment is absolute key within the project. Without an appropriate lighting control dimming system, the lighting project would not work. By using a control system, to adjust the light levels and set various scenes for services and events, the various spaces throughout the Abbey are scene set to appropriate light levels. This means that depending on the event occurring or daylight ingress levels, the intensity of the artificial light is adjusted accordingly. By using the lighting control system, vast amounts of energy is saved, along with running and maintenance costs.

Project Lighting Designer Neil Skinner whilst at LDP/Lightmatters

Newcastle Civic Centre is a central landmark at the heart of Newcastle upon Tyne, it’s a modern cutting edge construction with the lighting design to match. Flooded with colour changing high output projectors, the concrete façade appears to be immersed in colour. The nearby water reservoir adds to the magic of the night scene with reflections of the lighting projections. The Civic Centre is a true modern classic with a touch of colour to that’s fit for any occasion and can be appreciated from across the city.

https://www.newcastle.gov.uk/ 

SKR Lighting Design were approached to work on a major European project with award-winning architect Marek Tryzybowicz of MTDI, designing a new railway station and transport interchange hub to service the city of Poznan, Poland.

As well as a transport hub, the brief incorporated a huge destination shopping mall; and it all needed to be completed in time for the 2012 European Football championships.

The architect’s showstopping theatrical design of a curved façade required equally dramatic lighting, combining great creativity with sophisticated technology to suit a highly functional building at the heart of a city. We worked closely with Philips Lighting (now Signify) Poland / Polska who provided the equipment and controls solution.

The end result was a striking beacon within the city centre, which has now been fulfilling its multifaceted function for over a decade.

Smithfield Square is a community at the heart of Dublin 7. Created as a bustling cultural quarter, Smithfield Square is a vibrant area on Dublin’s northside. Right on the Luas Line, the square boasts high-end apartments as well as commercial property.

As a large historic market square space in Central Dublin, the brief was to provide general illumination and create a landmark. Neil skinner help develop custom designed 25m tall special masts. Included within the mast were ceremonial gas flame burners and high output narrow beam projectors, mounted in a linear arms 5m above the ground which project up to the reflective sails above. These magnificent sails are 3m square and are used to reflect the light softly across the space.

2021 Photography by James Mathews www.everestphotography.ie

envelopephone-handsetmenu-circle linkedin facebook pinterest youtube rss twitter instagram facebook-blank rss-blank linkedin-blank pinterest youtube twitter instagram