SKR Lighting Design were tasked with providing dramatic yet sympathetic and practical lighting to illuminate ‘Castle Mound’ in Oxford, on which defences were built in 1071AD for William the Conqueror. Whilst the castle itself is no longer there, Castle Mound itself is a considerable structure: 64ft high and 81ft in diameter, with a well chamber 20ft below the surface added to the top of the mound in the thirteenth century.

The mound needed to be lit on a practical level to illuminate its paths to the summit, but also to provide an attractive and intriguing presentation of the mound visible from a distance. Impact on the surrounding environment and energy efficiency also had to be considered, as well as due consideration given to the age and Grade-1-listed status of the monument.

We worked closely with architects, archaeologists, and the local heritage authority to decide on a design. We illuminated the meandering pathways using colour changing floor washers – practical but striking. The existing lighting to the trees on the mound was replaced with colour-changing and energy-efficient light sources.

The end result is a beautiful celebration of an ancient landmark, without negative impact on the surrounding cityscape.

As one of the top destination in Newcastle, The Gate had a complete architectural make-over in 2016 and SKR worked closely with Faulkner Brown Architects to create a new enhanced scheme that would give visual impact when viewed from the famous Bigg Market and Newgate Street. The exterior lighting was sensitively design so not to create unwanted light pollution, but at the same time draw attention and generate local buzz. Colour changing projectors with precise light beam optics were used to uplight the facade canopy, whilst not spilling light into the night sky. Carefully focussed adjustable spotlights were used to illuminate the entrance vestibule, clearly indicating the entrance for the public. These were supplemented with further colour changing projectors which enhance the entertainment and theatrical character of the project.

A large amount of design work and engineering went into the planning of the architectural effect lighting, which brought the interior of The Gate to life in mesmerising fashion. Elements such as theatrical animated projection, architectural lighting accents, fibre optic effect ceilings, colour changing lift-shafts and escalators and panelled light boxes all contributing to making The Gate interior the most exciting project within its location.

The centre piece of the project was a unique chandelier to represent champagne or prosecco bubbles in a glass. SKR Lighting worked alongside lighting product designers Northern Lights to manufacture unique products and brought in Robe Entertainment Lighting products to further animate the space. Together a show-stopping scene and environment was developed and realised.

Northern Lights https://northern-lights.co.uk/project/the-gate

Faulkner Brown https://faulknerbrowns.com/

UFO https://www.fibreopticlighting.com/the-gate-fibre-optic-star-cloth

Originally built in 2003 to the design of Sud Architects, Manufaktura has been at the cultural centre of Lodz, Poland. 20 years on it was commissioned for a revitalisation project to adapt it to the standards of a modern day visitor. In collaboration with an international team of designers and investor, Manufaktura has been equipped with state of the art lighting and control system to bring back its vibrancy and become so much more than a shopping mall, it’s now a destination for friends and family to meet, eat, shop and spend quality time together.

Nested at the heart of the red brick factory buildings that were once buzzing with textile machinery and now also readapted with fashionable restaurants, entertainment and shops.

The Parish Church of St. Peter & St. Paul in Deddington, Oxfordshire has been at the heart of the local community since the 13th century. Evolving architecturally since then and in the recent years SKR have played a role in the important events such as at Christmas time by setting up temporary lighting equipment to showcasing festive scenes with dynamic, colour changing projections for all to enjoy during musical events and recitals. In time for the festive season RGB festoon lighting is mounted at the crown of the Tower adding a touch of colour to the village during the darker months of the year.

Founded in 1135 for canons of the Augustinian order, Brinkburn was restored in the 19th century and now survives in its entirety as Northumberland's finest example of early Gothic architecture. It is easy to understand why the Augustinian canons who arrived at Brinkburn in 1135AD chose this beautiful setting for their priory, lying as it does in a hollow, almost surrounded by a loop in the River Coquet. Parts of the monastic buildings are incorporated into the elegant adjacent manor house. The magic of Brinkburn Priory lives on in the visitor's memory long after its graceful Gothic architecture and glowing stained glass have been left behind.

This was a very sensitive lighting and electrical project to coordinate. After a number of site meetings and workshops, it was concluded that the vertical surfaces of the Priory could not be touched. A totally bespoke design and product were required to provide the various scenes illumination, whilst not disturbing the original stone work. The lighting design was to illuminate the interior for functional and architectural purpose, but also to provide event quality illumination for musicians for classical music concerts. Oversized, floor standing, adjustable spotlight products were especially design for the project. By using a floor standing product, no walls were touched. However, the Victorian floor was carefully disassembled and reassembled to allow for new power cables to run around the floor.  All the lighting can be unplugged and removed to bring the Priory back to its original stark beautiful state.

As a place of serenity and worship, creating a welcoming and calm environment is absolute key within the project. Without an appropriate lighting control dimming system, the lighting project would not work. By using a control system, to adjust the light levels and set various scenes for services and events, the various spaces throughout the Abbey are scene set to appropriate light levels. This means that depending on the event occurring or daylight ingress levels, the intensity of the artificial light is adjusted accordingly. By using the lighting control system, vast amounts of energy is saved, along with running and maintenance costs.

Project Lighting Designer Neil Skinner whilst at 1860 Lighting Consultants

The Athens Concert Hall is a truly magnificent building with a varied pallet of materials, shapes and volumes exposing its grandeur. The lighting design is equally multifaceted, ranging from theatrical bright and dark contrasting lighting all the way to ambient, intimate, and warm areas where that is more appropriate. The interior of the concert hall sparkles with bright lights, to bring out the magic of the place, intelligently controlled to make room for the performances, always the feature of the Concert Hall.

Project Lighting Designer Neil Skinner whilst at LDP/Lightmatters.

Near to Venice, the Nave de Vero shopping centre has become a leisure destination. Architecturally designed as a nod to Venice’s history of trade on the seas, the lighting emphasises the shapes and geometry of the architecture. It was the first Italian building within the region to have claimed the much sough-after “Very Good” BREEAM certification, for its sustainability rating, of which the Lighting Design played a large role in.

Functional, architectural and entertainment lighting all crossed over in this exciting project.

In partnership with architects Design International.

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